Frog Frenzy at Vanaqua

This gallery contains 8 photos. Did you know that the American Bullfrog is native to eastern North America, but has been introduced to many parts of the world because people had a taste for frog legs? However, quite a few of these intended entrées have managed to flee from bullfrog farms in droves, and proliferated in the wild.

American-Bullfrog

The skin of the Golden Poison Dart Frog is deadly (it’s coated with extremely high levels of alkaloids). According to its Wiki profile, this gorgeous and small but deadly amphibian is purportedly the most lethal of any mammal, yet ironically makes an appearance on the Endangered list of animals.

Golden-Poison-frog

The Brazilian Horned Frog has a perpetually cross look on its face. This one apparently likes a rather pebbly blanket; the majority of its body is buried under it.

Brazilian-Horned-Frog

The strikingly coloured Yellow-Striped Poison Dart Frog. The contrasting hues, like those on coral snakes, are a warning to potential snackers to stay away! But — here’s an interesting fact: the lack of alkaloid-rich foods leaves captive-bred frogs without the ability to produce toxins (although wild-caught poison frogs can keep their poison for years. Thank you, Wikipedia. Yep, the jig is up!)

Yellow-Striped-Poison-Frog

Another poison frog on the Endangered list is the Phantasmal Poison Frog, seeking a little “re-leaf” from the paparazzi. You’ll need more leaves, fella.

Phantasmal-Poison-Frog

A (very young) Dyeing Dart Frog. I think.

Young-Dyeing-Dart-Frog

This is a False Tomato Frog (it looks quite genuine to me, and although I love tomatoes, I think Pizza Frog would be more descriptively apropos). Photographed at the Vancouver Aquarium on July 6.

False-Tomato-Frog

The non-venomous, non-poisonous Red-Eyed Tree Frog was shot in complete darkness in its giant terrarium in Night mode (hence the large amount of noise), which takes 4 consecutive exposures at varying shutter/exposure speeds. Had I not discerned its back legs from the other side of the glass, I would have missed it completely!

Red-Eyed-Green-Tree-Frog

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8 thoughts on “Frog Frenzy at Vanaqua

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